ARTICLES WE’RE READING NOW >> ART (X) TECH

We are passionate about the intersection of Art & Technology. Check out some of the great articles that we’re reading now:

CNN  // 
Virtually Unknown: How to Put a Price Tag on the Most Progressive Form of Art

“Christie’s chief marketing officer, Marc Sands, believes that it is only a matter of time before VR starts appearing at major auctions.”  Read more.

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Artnet News // 
Cindy Sherman Just Made Her Instagram Account Public and It’s Amazing

“Before the age of social media and its painstakingly sculpted personae, Pictures Generation artist Cindy Sherman had already established herself as the art world’s reigning queen of self-reinvention, using the camera to morph into one character after another.”  Read more.

 Cindy Sherman. Image Courtesy ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images.

Cindy Sherman. Image Courtesy ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images.

Fast Company // 
Lovely Pixel Paintings Created By Software Following Its Own Muse

“When a programmer writes software to create spontaneous art, who do we call the artist? Because whereas artists of yesteryear worked in oil paints and canvas, Andreas Nicolas Fischer has a computer paint his pictures for him.”  Read more.

 Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Artnet News // 
The Guggenheim Just Restored Its First Web Artwork.  Here’s How. 

“Even the Internet has ruins worthy of preservation. Amid remnants of the early web, the Guggenheim has restored Shu Lea Cheang’s Brandon (1998–99), the first online artwork to join the New York museum’s permanent collection. The long-defunct website, commissioned by the Guggenheim in 1998 and hosted at http://brandon.guggenheim.org, is the first digital artwork to be restored by the museum.”  Read more. 

 Shu Lea Cheang, Brandon (1998–99). Courtesy of the Guggenheim, © Shu Lea Cheang.

Shu Lea Cheang, Brandon (1998–99). Courtesy of the Guggenheim, © Shu Lea Cheang.

New York Times // 
A Brief History of Emoji Art, All the Way to Hollywood

“Emoji themselves are intriguing design objects, embedded with clues to the culture in which they are created and shared. Last year, the Museum of Modern Art acquired the very first set of emoji characters.”  Read more. 

 The original set of 176 emojis, designed for a Japanese mobile provider and acquired by the Museum of Modern Art.CreditShigetaka Kurita/Museum of Modern Art

The original set of 176 emojis, designed for a Japanese mobile provider and acquired by the Museum of Modern Art.CreditShigetaka Kurita/Museum of Modern Art

Widewalls //
Meet Contemporary Video Artists Whose Work Intrigues and Captivates

“According to Hegel, artists should be the ones to follow the Zeitgeist, and moreover, to trace the path they find to be progressive – that is what makes art rise above kitsch. Back in the early 1960s, video was a new medium, and the artists who managed to recognize its potential have unlocked a new chapter in art.”  Read more.

 Pipilotti Rist: Pour Your Body Out

Pipilotti Rist: Pour Your Body Out